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The physical side of tumor progression: Combining 3D engineered sacffolds and a novel imaging method to study cell response to mechaniacl cues in the tumor microenvironment

Dr François Bordeleau

19/09/2017 @ 11:00 - LOEX R-138, Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus

Conférence

Organisée par : Lucie Germain

The physical side of tumor progression: Combining 3D engineered scaffolds and a novel imaging
method to study cell response to mechanical cues in the tumor microenvironment
 
The ability of cells to elicit reactions to mechanical cues and properly interact with the extracellular
matrix (ECM) is crucial during both organogenesis and pathological processes. This is particularly true
during tumor progression, where the ECM progressively stiffens over time due to increased ECM
deposition and crosslinking. In this context, combining engineered models of the tumor
microenvironment and novel tools to assess associated cell response can help us gain valuable insight to
understand how the physical properties of the tumor microenvironment facilitate tumor progression. In
the first part of my talk, I will focus on my work on engineered ECM scaffolds to study stiffness-mediated
molecular processes. Notably, using non-enzymatic ribose-mediated glycation crosslinking methods, the
stiffness of a collagen scaffold can be tuned independent of its architecture. Using this system, we have
demonstrated that matrix stiffness influences both angiogenesis and leakiness of the tumor vasculature.
In the second part of my talk, I will present a novel approach that uses quantitative polarization
microscopy (QPol) to directly measure cell contractility. In fact, the optical anisotropy map measured by
QPol is linked to the cell’s contractility state in both 2D and 3D culture conditions. Furthermore, QPol
can be used to image complex biological systems, including tumor sections. Together, this novel QPol
imaging method and the use of engineered scaffolds provide a powerful toolbox to study the role of
mechanical cues in many biological processes.

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